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Ray Krishnamurthy
Ray Krishnamurthy

A Review of The War of Art by Steven Pressfield: Why You Should Listen to This Audio Book


The War of Art by Steven Pressfield: A Book Review




Have you ever wanted to write a book, start a business, or pursue any other creative endeavor, but felt stuck, procrastinated, or gave up? If so, you are not alone. Many people struggle with what Steven Pressfield calls "resistance" - the invisible force that prevents us from doing our most important work.




the war of art steven pressfield audio book 136



In his bestselling book The War of Art, Pressfield reveals how resistance manifests itself in various ways, such as fear, doubt, self-sabotage, perfectionism, rationalization, and distraction. He also shows how we can overcome resistance by becoming professionals, committing to our craft, and accessing higher inspiration and creativity.


In this article, I will review The War of Art by Steven Pressfield and share with you why I think it is one of the most powerful books for anyone who wants to unleash their creative potential. I will also discuss the benefits and drawbacks of listening to the audio book version of The War of Art, which is narrated by Pressfield himself. Finally, I will give you some tips on how to combine listening and reading for optimal results.


The Main Concept: Resistance




The core idea of The War of Art is that there is a universal force that opposes our creative endeavors. Pressfield calls this force "resistance". Resistance is not something external, but internal. It is not a person, but a feeling. It is not rational, but emotional. It is not evil, but natural. It is not personal, but impersonal.


Resistance is what makes us feel anxious, bored, tired, or depressed when we face a blank page, a new project, or a challenging goal. Resistance is what makes us procrastinate, avoid, or quit when we encounter difficulties, criticism, or rejection. Resistance is what makes us settle for less than our best, or give up on our dreams altogether.


Resistance is the enemy of creativity, and we must wage a war against it. Pressfield writes: "The more important a call or action is to our soul's evolution, the more resistance we will feel toward pursuing it". Therefore, we must not let resistance stop us, but use it as a guide to what we should do.


The Three Parts of the Book




The War of Art is divided into three parts, each with a different focus and purpose. Here is a brief summary of each part and the main lessons learned.


Part One: Defining the Enemy




In the first part of the book, Pressfield describes the nature and characteristics of resistance. He explains how resistance operates in different domains, such as writing, art, business, sports, health, education, and spirituality. He also identifies the common forms and symptoms of resistance, such as fear, self-doubt, perfectionism, rationalization, procrastination, addiction, victimhood, and criticism.


The main lesson from this part is to recognize and acknowledge resistance in ourselves and others. We must not deny, ignore, or justify resistance, but face it head-on. We must not take resistance personally, but understand that it is a natural and universal phenomenon. We must not let resistance define us, but challenge us to grow and improve.


Part Two: Combating Resistance




In the second part of the book, Pressfield offers a solution to overcome resistance. He argues that the only way to defeat resistance is to become a professional. A professional is someone who treats their creative work as a job, not a hobby. A professional is someone who shows up every day, no matter what. A professional is someone who works hard, follows a routine, and meets deadlines. A professional is someone who respects their craft, their audience, and themselves.


The main lesson from this part is to adopt the mindset and habits of a professional. We must not wait for inspiration, motivation, or permission to do our work, but do it anyway. We must not be dependent on external factors, such as mood, feedback, or reward to do our work, but do it for its own sake. We must not be attached to the outcome of our work, but focus on the process.


Part Three: Beyond Resistance




In the third part of the book, Pressfield explores the source and nature of creativity. He suggests that there is a higher realm of inspiration and intelligence that we can access when we overcome resistance. He calls this realm "the Muse" or "the Self". The Muse is the force that guides and supports our creative work. The Self is our true identity and potential that we can express through our creative work.


The main lesson from this part is to trust and surrender to the Muse and the Self. We must not rely on our ego, logic, or analysis to do our work, but listen to our intuition, imagination, and vision. We must not try to control or manipulate our work, but let it flow through us. We must not take credit or blame for our work, but acknowledge that it comes from a higher source.


The Benefits of Listening to the Audio Book




One of the advantages of listening to The War of Art instead of reading it is that you can enjoy the benefits of audio learning. Audio learning is a form of learning that involves listening to spoken words rather than reading written words. Audio learning has several benefits over reading, such as:


The Narrator's Voice and Tone




One of the benefits of listening to The War of Art is that you can hear the voice and tone of the author himself. Steven Pressfield narrates his own book with passion, conviction, and humor. He speaks directly to you as if he were your mentor or coach. He uses various vocal techniques such as emphasis, pause, repetition, and inflection to convey his message and mood. He also adds some personal anecdotes and stories that are not in the written version.


Listening to Pressfield's voice and tone can enhance your understanding and appreciation of his book. You can feel his emotions and intentions behind his words. You can sense his sincerity and authenticity in sharing his insights and experiences. You can also relate to him more as a fellow human being who has faced and overcome resistance in his own life.


The Convenience and Flexibility




```html to read it. You can simply use your headphones or speakers and listen to it while you are driving, walking, cooking, cleaning, or doing any other activity. You can also adjust the speed, volume, and playback of the audio book to suit your preference and situation.


Listening to The War of Art can save you time and energy. You don't need to allocate a specific time or place to read it. You can multitask and learn while you are doing other things. You can also listen to it more than once without getting bored or tired.


The Retention and Comprehension




A third benefit of listening to The War of Art is that you can absorb and remember more information than reading it. Studies have shown that audio learning can improve retention and comprehension by stimulating different parts of the brain and engaging multiple senses. Audio learning can also enhance recall and recognition by creating auditory cues and associations.


Listening to The War of Art can help you learn and apply its concepts and principles better. You can hear the words and phrases that Pressfield uses to explain his ideas and examples. You can also imagine the scenes and scenarios that he describes in his stories and anecdotes. You can also repeat or rewind the parts that you find important or interesting.


The Drawbacks of Listening to the Audio Book




However, listening to The War of Art also has some disadvantages compared to reading it. There are some aspects of the book that you might miss or overlook by listening to it. There are also some challenges and limitations that you might face by listening to it. Here are some of the drawbacks of listening to the audio book:


The Lack of Visuals and References




One of the drawbacks of listening to The War of Art is that you don't get to see the visuals and references that are in the written version. The written version of The War of Art has some illustrations, diagrams, charts, and tables that complement and clarify the text. It also has some footnotes, endnotes, citations, and bibliographies that provide additional information and sources.


By listening to The War of Art, you might miss some of the details and nuances that are conveyed by the visuals and references. You might not get the full picture or context of what Pressfield is saying. You might also not be able to verify or explore his claims and arguments further.


The Distraction and Interruption




Another drawback of listening to The War of Art is that you might get distracted or interrupted by external noises or events. Unlike reading, which requires your full attention and concentration, listening allows you to do other things at the same time. However, this also means that you might not be able to focus on the audio book as much as you should. You might get sidetracked by your thoughts, feelings, or actions. You might also get disturbed by your environment, such as people, traffic, weather, or devices.


By listening to The War of Art, you might lose track or interest of what Pressfield is saying. You might miss some important points or messages that he is trying to convey. You might also not be able to appreciate his tone or style as much as you could.


The Passive and Linear Approach




A third drawback of listening to The War of Art is that you might adopt a passive and linear approach to learning. Listening is a receptive skill that involves receiving information from a source without much interaction or feedback. Listening is also a sequential skill that follows a fixed order without much flexibility or choice. Therefore, listening can limit your involvement and control over your learning process.


By listening to The War of Art, you might not engage with the book as deeply as you could by reading it. You might not question, challenge, or critique Pressfield's ideas and opinions. You might not relate, connect, or apply his insights and experiences to your own situation. You might also not review, summarize, or synthesize his key points and takeaways.


The Best Way to Experience the Book




So, what is the best way to experience The War of Art? Should you listen to it or read it? The answer is: both. By combining listening and reading, you can enjoy the benefits of both methods and overcome the drawbacks of each one. You can also enhance your learning and appreciation of the book by using different strategies and techniques. Here are some tips on how to do that:


Listen First, Read Later




One way to combine listening and reading is to listen to the audio book first and then read the written version later. This way, you can get an overview of the book by listening to it and then dive deeper into the details by reading it. You can also compare and contrast the two versions and notice the differences and similarities between them.


To do this, you can listen to the audio book in one sitting or in several sessions, depending on your preference and availability. You can also take some notes or highlight some parts that you find interesting or important while listening. Then, you can read the written version at your own pace and convenience. You can also refer to your notes or highlights while reading.


Read Along with the Audio Book




Another way to combine listening and reading is to read along with the audio book. This means that you read the written version while listening to the narrator at the same time. This way, you can enhance your concentration and understanding by using both your eyes and ears. You can also improve your pronunciation and comprehension by following the narrator's voice and tone.


To do this, you need to have both the audio book and the written version ready. You can use a physical book or an electronic device to read the text. You can also use headphones or speakers to listen to the sound. Then, you can synchronize the audio book and the written version by starting them at the same time. You can also pause, resume, or skip them as needed.


Take Notes and Review Them




A third way to combine listening and reading is to take notes while listening or reading and then review them later. This means that you write down some key points, summaries, questions, or comments that you have while listening or reading. This way, you can reinforce your learning and retention by using both your hands and brain. You can also apply your learning and reflection by using your notes as a reference or a guide.


To do this, you need to have a pen and a paper or an electronic device to write your notes. You can use any format or style that suits you, such as bullet points, mind maps, outlines, or diagrams. You can also use any language or symbols that you prefer, such as words, phrases, abbreviations, or emojis. Then, you can review your notes after listening or reading or at a later time. You can also revise, edit, or expand your notes as needed.


Conclusion




The War of Art by Steven Pressfield is a powerful book that teaches us how to overcome resistance and unleash our creative potential. It is divided into three parts: defining the enemy, combating resistance, and beyond resistance. It is full of insights, examples, stories, and advice that are relevant and applicable to anyone who wants to do their most important work.


Listening to The War of Art has some benefits over reading it, such as hearing the narrator's voice and tone, enjoying the convenience and flexibility, and improving the retention and comprehension. However, listening to The War of Art also has some drawbacks compared to reading it, such as missing the visuals and references, getting distracted or interrupted, and adopting a passive and linear approach.


The best way to experience The War of Art is to combine listening and reading for optimal results. You can do this by listening first and reading later, reading along with the audio book, or taking notes and reviewing them. By doing this, you can enhance your learning and appreciation of this amazing book.


FAQs




  • Who is Steven Pressfield?



  • What is The War of Art about?



  • What are some examples of resistance?



  • How can I become a professional?



  • What is the Muse?



  • ```html Steven Pressfield is an American author of fiction and non-fiction books. He is best known for his historical novels such as The Legend of Bagger Vance, Gates of Fire, The Afghan Campaign, and The Lion's Gate. He is also known for his books on creativity and writing such as The War of Art, Do the Work, Turning Pro, The Artist's Journey, and Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t.



  • The War of Art is a book that teaches us how to overcome resistance and unleash our creative potential. It is divided into three parts: defining the enemy, combating resistance, and beyond resistance. It is full of insights, examples, stories, and advice that are relevant and applicable to anyone who wants to do their most important work.



  • Some examples of resistance are fear, doubt, self-sabotage, perfectionism, rationalization, procrastination, addiction, victimhood, and criticism. Resistance can manifest itself in different ways depending on the domain, situation, and person. Resistance is the invisible force that prevents us from doing our creative work.



  • To become a professional, we need to treat our creative work as a job, not a hobby. We need to show up every day, no matter what. We need to work hard, follow a routine, and meet deadlines. We need to respect our craft, our audience, and ourselves. We need to overcome resistance by committing to our work and doing it for its own sake.



  • The Muse is the force that guides and supports our creative work. It is also known as the Self, the Source, or the Genius. The Muse is the higher realm of inspiration and intelligence that we can access when we overcome resistance. The Muse is what gives us our ideas, insights, and visions. The Muse is what makes us create something original and unique.



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