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Ray Krishnamurthy
Ray Krishnamurthy

DocFetcher Is Like Google For Your Hard Drive ((FULL))


Crap-free: We strive to keep DocFetcher's user interface clutter- and crap-free. No advertisement or "would you like to register...?" popups. No useless stuff is installed in your web browser, registry or anywhere else in your system.




DocFetcher is like Google for your hard drive



Cross-platform: Unlike many of its competitors, DocFetcher does not only run on Windows, but also on Linux and OS X. Thus, if you ever feel like moving away from your Windows box and on to Linux or OS X, DocFetcher will be waiting for you on the other side.


Portable: One of DocFetcher's greatest strengths is its portability. Basically, with DocFetcher you can build up a complete, fully searchable document repository, and carry it around on your USB drive. More on that in the next section.


Usage examples: There are all kinds of things you can do with such a repository: You can carry it with you on a USB drive, burn it onto a CD-ROM for archiving purposes, put it in an encrypted volume (recommended: TrueCrypt), synchronize it between multiple computers via a cloud storage service like DropBox, etc. Better yet, since DocFetcher is Open Source, you can even redistribute your repository: Upload it and share it with the rest of the world if you want.


DocFetcher supports searching Outlook emails (but not searching emails of other email programs). Outlook stores its emails in a file with PST extension, so you need to locate this PST file on your hard drive. Once you've done that, open DocFetcher, right-click in the "Search Scope" at the bottom left and select "Create Index From > Outlook PST". Then select the PST file. The rest is the same as for searching normal folders, which is explained in the manual.


Other than that, I would advise against indexing an entire harddrive. Indexing a smaller set of files is not only faster and decreases the likelihood of out-of-memory errors, but will also give you better search results.


You wrote, "Other than that, I would advise against indexing an entire harddrive. Indexing a smaller set of files is not only faster and decreases the likelihood of out-of-memory errors, but will also give you better search results."


Well, normally one would only the select the directories containing documents for indexing. But if all of the directories on your drive contain searchable files, then I guess there's no other way than indexing the whole drive.


Memory issues: DocFetcher needs to keep tiny representations of your files in memory. Because of this, and because system folders usually contain a very large number of files, DocFetcher will be more likely to run out of memory if you index system folders.


Waste of resources, worse search results: Apart from these technical reasons, indexing system folders is most likely a waste of indexing time and disk space, and it will also pollute your search results with unneeded system files. So, for the best results in the least amount of time, just index what you need.


And as you type, Listary will show you a list of all files on your system that match the query in real-time. Listary can also execute commands like Open Folder and Copy Folder Path. You can even use Listary to quickly hop into a different folder just by typing that folder's name.


If you're someone who likes to have a more hands-on approach with your PC, then grepWin will be one of the most useful tools you'll have at your disposal. With it, you can search through any directory tree, and it will find files by matching contents with your search query (regular expressions are supported).


Can you guess how much of your hard drive space is wasted by duplicate files? The answer might surprise you. Duplicate files are more common than we tend to think, and if those duplicates are image, audio, or video files, they can take up a lot of unnecessary space.


UltraSearch is a creation of JAM Software. They are also the creators of the popular hard drive space recovery program, TreeSize. UltraSearch offers essential search features plus a few extras, all while keeping it simple and fast.


Launchy is a nifty app that's meant to replace the Start Menu, the Taskbar, the File Explorer, and desktop shortcuts. If you've ever used a Mac, then it's a bit like Spotlight. Launchy indexes your entire system, then lets you launch files, apps, folders, and bookmarks with just a few keystrokes.


Wise JetSearch can search all the hard drives and partitions, be they removable disks or secondary disk. It supports a variety of drive formats such as NTFS, FAT, and exFAT. Features like Quick Search and Preview Pane make using a Wise JetSearch a suitable alternative to the default Windows Search tool.


Are you an open-source aficionado? Then you'll probably like DocFetcher. It's a free, open-source desktop search application that can help you search through heaps of files on your computer with blazing fast speed.


I wonder whether or not it is possible to combine a read-only server-side index ("the network drive for all employees") with a set of personal local indices ("my own data"). Is this possible with DocFetcher from your point of view?


grepWin may look like your average search tool, but this program allows you to use regular expression for a deeper and thorough search. A regular expression is a type of advanced searching that looks for particular patterns rather than terms and phrases. This works well for users who file their documents using the same strings of characters as it can help them pull out all the files they need in one search rather than typing each filename separately.


If you need a desktop search tool that goes beyond your computer's files, Copernic Desktop Search is an excellent choice. The free version allows you to index more than 119 different file types, while the paid version offers a thorough search that includes files from Microsoft Office, Outlook, cloud services, PDF, and so much more. Additionally, you can look for files on each drive of your computer with a minimal waiting period.


Agent Ransack is a free search tool that lets you search using several expressions, including Boolean and regular expression. It also lets you save your search workspace and export it if you need to. The interface is intuitive and straightforward. Moreover, you have the option to search using filenames or containing texts while letting you choose which drive the tool should search in.


There are plenty of tools that you can use to find a specific file or document by its name on your local hard disk or remote share. But what if you need to find a document containing a word or text fragment? Enter DocFetcher, a graphical desktop search application that can search inside documents. It supports a wide range of popular document formats, including Microsoft Office, HTML, PDF, RTF, plain text, and OpenOffice.org. If you are running Ubuntu, you can install DocFetcher using its .deb package. For other Linux distributions, you can download an archived version of the application, unpack it, and launch DocFetcher using the DocFetcher.sh script.


UltraSearch scans MFT (Master File Table) of your drive partition to look for data instead of indexing everything in your PC. This allows it to let you immediately start a search without having the need to index data first. It may not be able to track file changes in real-time, but you can always rescan MFT to manually update data.


MasterSeeker is another very easy to use Windows search tool that is also very fast. In my experience, it was very quick in indexing all of my data and took hardly 3 seconds to index all the drives.


An open-source Windows search alternative that completely focuses on indexing and finding content inside files. For privacy reasons, it lets you specify which part of the hard drive should be indexed, unlike other tools that index all the data on the hard drive.


For finding content inside the files, you can either use regular expressions or advanced expressions using operators like +, -, and, OR, etc. With the paid version, you will get few extra features like the ability to open results in multiple tabs, export data, sync your data with other devices, and few more.


Using this method you can have a portable jDownloader folder with Java included which can be placed in any hard drive folder or external USB drive. Obviously you can do this with many other Java based applications not just jDownloader.


Everything is great for searching files by name, but less-than-ideal for discovering sensitive data by content. It's really easy to build a search that looks like it is valid and returns no or few matches, but is really an unreported error in your search syntax. Keep a local repo of target files to validate your searches against if you plan to use this tool in an engagement against unknown target data.


Everything is great for searching files by name, but less-than-ideal for discovering sensitive data by content. It\'s really easy to build a search that looks like it is valid and returns no or few matches, but is really an unreported error in your search syntax. Keep a local repo of target files to validate your searches against if you plan to use this tool in an engagement against unknown target data.


The .exe extension on a filename indicates an executable file. Executable files may, in some cases, harm your computer. Therefore, please read below to decide for yourself whether the docfetcher-daemon-win.exe on your computer is a Trojan that you should remove, or whether it is a file belonging to the Windows operating system or to a trusted application.


Important: Some malware camouflages itself as docfetcher-daemon-win.exe, particularly when located in the C:\Windows or C:\Windows\System32 folder. Therefore, you should check the docfetcher-daemon-win.exe process on your PC to see if it is a threat. We recommend Security Task Manager for verifying your computer's security. This was one of the Top Download Picks of The Washington Post and PC World.


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